Archive for July, 2012

Volunteer Work Day Set for San Jacinto Wildlife Area – August 4th

Tom Trakes from San Jacinto Wildlife Area advised me today that the date for the next volunteer work day at San Jacinto Wildlife Area has been set for Saturday, August 4th. As reported in SoCalHunt’s last blog entry, Tom told me that this work day will be primarily to clean out and make ready the 65 water control structures on the wildlife area’s duck ponds so they can start flooding for the upcoming season. Tom advised that anyone coming out to volunteer should bring gloves, shovels and/or hoes and lots of drinking water, since its expected to be hot. Tom also told me that the hunter’s education class that was possibly going to be held on the workday will not be held after all. After the work is done we will get together at a local Mexican restaurant for a well-deserved lunch (each person responsible for their own bill).

The next volunteer work day is tentatively set for Saturday, September 22nd and will be a blind brush-up day to prepare the blinds for the season. When this date is determined for sure you will see it here on SoCalHunt.

Hopefully we’ll have a good turnout as 65 water control structures is a lot to clean out and, of course, the more the merrier (and the less work for each person). Tom said he’s hoping for about 25 volunteers as he figures that’s what it will take to get all the work done.

If you have any questions contact Tom Trakes at the San Jacinto headquarters at (951) 236-3040, or the San Jacinto staff at (951) 928-0580.

Here’s the official flyer:

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Tentative Date Set for Volunteer Work Day at San Jacinto Wildlife Area

Tom Trakes, from San Jacinto Wildlife Area, advised that the next volunteer work day for San Jacinto Wildlife Area would be either Saturday, August 4th or Saturday, August 11th. Tom told me that this work day will be primarily to clean out and make ready the 65 water control structures on the wildlife area’s duck ponds so they can start flooding for the upcoming season. Tom said his preference of dates is for the 4th but won’t know for sure until at least the middle of next week (watch for an announcement of the exact date here on SoCalHunt). Tom advised that anyone coming out to volunteer should bring gloves, shovels and/or hoes and lots of water, since its expected to be hot. Tom also told me that if there is enough interest they may have a small (25 student max) hunter’s education class on the day of the volunteer work day. After the work is done we will get together at a local Mexican restaurant for a well deserved lunch (each person responsible for their own bill).

Tom also told me that they have tentatively set Saturday, September 22nd as the volunteer blind brush-up day at San Jacinto. Again, when this date is determined for sure you will see it here on SoCalHunt.

Hopefully we’ll have a good turnout as 65 water control structures is a lot to clean out and, of course, the more the merrier (and the less work for each person).

Again, watch SoCalHunt for final details of both upcoming volunteer work days.

Duck Numbers Up for the Coming Season!

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported that duck numbers were up significantly over last year’s duck count. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Flyway.us web site reported:

“Preliminary results for the 2012 Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey are now available. The estimate of 48.6 million birds was 7% higher than last year’s estimate of 45.6 million, and was 43% above the long-term average.”

Flyway.us reported that Mallards were up to approximately 10.6 million, which was 15% above the 2011 estimate of 9.2 million, and 40% above the long-term average of 7.6 million. Bluewing Teal numbers are approximately 9.2 million, which was similar to the 2011 estimate and 94% above the long-term average of 4.8 million. Green-winged teal are up to 3.5 million, which was 20% above the 2011 estimate and 74% above the long-term average of 2.0 million. The estimate for American wigeon is 2.1 million was similar to the 2011 estimate and 17% below the long-term average of 2.6 million. Estimated numbers of gadwall are 3.6 million was similar to the 2011 estimate and 96% above the long-term average 1.8 million. Scaup (both greater and lesser) showed 5.2 million which is 21% above the 2011 estimate and similar to the long-term average of 5.0 million. Northern shoveler (our beloved spoonys) are 5.0 million which was similar to the 2011 estimate and 111% above the long-term average of 2.4 million. Redheads were 1.3 million which is similar to the 2011 estimate and 89% above the long-term average of 0.7 million. Canvasbacks showed 0.8 million which was similar to the 2011 estimate and 33% above the long-term average of 0.6 million. The only birds that showed any appreciable decrease were Pintails at 3.5 million, which was 22% below the 2011 estimate of 4.4 million and 14% below the long-term average of 4.0 million.

So it looks like its shaping up to be a great season already. Now all we need here in Southern California is some severe weather up north at the right time to trigger the duck’s migration down to our area.

As I type this its 114 days until the season opens down here in our neck of the woods. It might be a good time to start getting the gear together and cleaned up and inventoried. Oh, and maybe think about stocking up on shells as it looks like we’re going to have more birds to shoot at this season.


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